Los Angeles U.S. Courthouse

A GSA Design Excellence Project
This project will create thousands of jobs and turn an empty lot into an important part of the Civic Center cityscape.
Eric Garcetti, Mayor, Los Angeles
Location: 
Los Angeles, California
Client: 
General Services Administration
Contract Value: 
$326,000,000
Size: 
600,000 Square Feet
Year Completed: 
2016

Completed in 2016, the new United States Courthouse in downtown Los Angeles was constructed by a Clark-led design-build team, which includes architect Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, LLP.

Clark constructed the 10-story, 600,000 square-foot court building for the General Services Administration. Referred to as the “Cube” because of its shape, the new facility features 24 courtrooms and 32 justice chambers. A sky-lit central courtyard (“Light Court“) at the structure’s core provides natural light and circulation to the building’s interior spaces. The Cube is anchored by two levels of below-grade parking, as well as mechanical and back-of-house spaces.

The new courthouse has a unique design that addressed the Federal Government’s blast and setback requirements. Clark constructed a structural frame for the "Cube" that sits back an entire bay around the first floor, providing for 36 additional feet of setback on each side of the building perimeter.

Sustainability

Among the facility’s sustainable elements is a combined cooling, heating, and power plant (CCHP) or “Tri-Gen” system. The electrical system includes two 5,000-Amp substations and a 2500kW diesel generator for emergency power. 

Additionally, the building envelope features a high-performance faceted curtain wall façade. This system gives the courthouse a lively expression that changes throughout the day; it also will reduce radiant heat input through the building envelope and provides ample natural light to internal courtrooms and common areas. The project also includes a 52,000 square-foot, 400 kW photovoltaic array at the roof.

The project is convertible to using biomass materials in the future so that it can one day reach net-zero energy.

Awards: 
Green GOOD Design™ Award - European Center for Architecture Art Design and Studies